The 3 Worst Holiday Gifts I Ever Received*

Nov 27 2012

*And one excellent suggestion for the best holiday gift ever

By Robin Bradford

  1. Plaid jeans. Do I really need to explain why this was a poor choice for a 13 year-old girl in 1975?
  2. Ice cream cone candle. The 1970s were full of ugly fads such as ubiquitous candles shaped to look (and smell) like food. There were pizza candles and apple candles and probably broccoli candles. My vanilla and strawberry ice cream candle smelled great but, um, could you hold this for a minute?
  3. White Christmas. Well, actually this was not a gift but when I as a 7 year-old I moved from Oklahoma to Denver I thought a Christmas blizzard was the perfect present. I failed to understand that for weeks it would be too cold and icy outside to ride my shiny new bicycle.

 

While I know my parents/the weather gods had the very best intentions when they chose these holiday gifts, sometimes good thoughts simply aren’t enough. That’s where #GivingTuesday comes in.

I’m delighted to say that some bright and happy folks (who probably received one too many pairs of light-up holiday socks) are bringing us #GivingTuesday. Today I invite you to join me and the CASA family in a national movement that aims to transform the way people think about, talk about and participate in the giving season.

Today I invite you to give a gift that will never be tossed in the back of a closet but will always be appreciated—a gift to CASA of Travis County in honor of someone you love.

Your gift is pretty much guaranteed to make a child’s stay in foster care shorter, increase that child’s grades and health and make it more likely that said child will be adopted. Your gift is efficient and responsible and will also bring a smile to the face of a child and his or her CASA volunteer. That’s a lot of goodness packed into one generous gift.

We’ll send your special someone a cute card with a thoughtful message to tell them about your gift.

#GivingTuesday is a simple idea. Find a way for your family, your community, your company or your organization to join in acts of giving. Tell everyone you can about what you are doing and why it matters. Join a national celebration of our great tradition of generosity—and give a child in our community who’s been abused or neglected a CASA volunteer to rely on.